Funeral Planning

To those planning the funeral of a loved one:
“I am the resurrection and the life,” Jesus says to us, giving us comfort and hope in time of sorrow. In Our Lord Jesus Christ we have found one who has conquered death itself. The funeral liturgy of the church is the privileged place of encounter with the Lord. The Mass is offered on behalf of our loved one and we are filled with strength and hope for we know that the Lord’s love is total.

Through the Funeral Planning Guide you will find help to plan the funeral liturgy of your loved one.  Some families find it helpful to pick out the readings and songs that will be used for the liturgy, others may choose to just have the priest or minister choose those readings. Families are invited to fill out as much or as little as they choose.

Once you have completed the packet please call the office at 614.231.4509 to schedule a meeting with a priest or deacon. He will meet with you to finalize your selections. Please do not hesitate to call us for any questions or concerns during this time.

Together as the church, the body of Christ, we shall gather to worship the Lord in our time of sorrow and express our Hope in the promise of the Lord.

Download the Funeral Planning Guide

What about Cremation?
Although cremation in the United States of America was in the past closely associated with opinions that rejected our faith in the resurrection of the body, the Church no longer prohibits it, so long as it is not used as a sign of disrespect for the dead or a denial of the bodily resurrection.

If cremation is chosen, it should ordinarily take place following the funeral mass, and the cremated remains are then entombed or buried in the same dignified way that the body would be. Respect for the body requires that the cremated remains be treated with the same respect after cremation that the body deserves.

The Church also permits the celebration of the funeral Mass in the presence of the cremated remains and that is possible here in the Diocese of Columbus. Here again, the cremated remains must always be honored with the same reverence and respect that is their due as the residual elements of the human body that itself was sanctified and recognized through the sacraments.

St. Catharine Church